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Posts by: Dr. Sarah Zadek, ND

The Microbiome in Crohn’s and the Use of Probiotics

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How the Western Diet Causes Gut Inflammation

With multiple documentaries highlighting the negative effects of eating fast food, it’s not surprising that consuming processed foods – including the ones in your grocery store – contribute to inflammation and poor health. You might wonder, how exactly does that happen? If we are consuming foods made with grains and protein, why does this affect us so badly? We’re finding multiple mechanisms at play here, which is likely why we see such drastic changes when individuals attempt to live exclusively off fast foods in as little as days to weeks. First, consuming overly processed foods negatively impacts our gut microbiome,

Nutrient Supplementation for Fertility

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Natural Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease

Metabolic syndrome refers to the “perfect storm” of hypertension, dyslipidemia, poor blood glucose regulation, and the presence of intra-abdominal adipose accumulation. Having metabolic syndrome increases the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in addition to Type 2 diabetes. Prevention and treatment of each of these disorders includes dietary and lifestyle changes, including decreasing intake of sugar and simple carbohydrates, and regular physical activity. However, many individuals find these changes too difficult, or may need additional support if areas such as blood pressure, glucose, insulin or cholesterol aren’t coming into normal range within a reasonable amount of time. Conventional

The use and efficacy of (dietary) phytoestrogens in menopause

Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that are structurally similar to estradiol. As they can interact with estrogen receptors (ER) and influence other signalling pathways, supplemental phytoestrogens and the plant foods they come from represent an alternative therapy to hormone-replacement treatment (HRT) in perimenopausal and menopausal women. Estradiol plays multiple roles in the overall health of women including protection of the cardiovascular system and of bone density. Therefore its decline, associated with menopause, can increase the risk of atherosclerosis, decreased bone density and osteoporosis. Common symptoms include vaginal dryness and atrophy, changes in mood, increased fatigue, insomnia, central weight gain, hot flashes

Early Prevention of Osteoarthritis

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The use and efficacy of (dietary) phytoestrogens in menopause

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Sperm and Testicular Health

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Sperm and Testicular Health

Sperm health isn’t typically on men’s radar unless they have been experiencing difficultly conceiving with their partner. Many men, unlike women, tend not to change many lifestyle or dietary factors when trying to conceive. Therefore many continue to drink, smoke, have poor sleep habits, or maintain a high body fat percentage at the beginning of the fertility journey. These factors have been associated with sexual and reproductive dysfunction including decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and ejaculation issues.1  What most men don’t know is that spontaneous genetic mutations arise more often in the father’s germ cell line and are majorly influenced by

Libido and Aging

Experiencing changes in libido, or sexual desire is common as we age. Sexual function is affected by multiple factors including hormone levels, pain, mood, age, relationship satisfaction, stress and history of sexual trauma. From mid-life to menopause, increased fatigue and joint pain in combination from changes in estrogen, testosterone and DHEA can affect sexual desire. The decline in estrogen specifically alters the vaginal tissue leading to decreased lubrication and increased irritation and pain. There are many ways in which women can address this and improve arousal and sexual experience including non-hormonal and hormonal options.  Hormonal and vaginal changes with aging

Concussions and the use of light therapy

A head injury may or may not look bad on the outside, but the impact of the brain against the inside of the skull can cause widespread axonal damage to neurons. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussion, can lead to loss of consciousness, and/or trauma-related amnesia (lasting less than 24 hours); a     nd long-term consequences may include: impaired cognitive function, altered mood      and difficulties with concentration.1,2  It doesn’t take multiple impacts to see disruptions in nervous system function. Even a single mTBI can cause behavioural and cognitive issues, and disruptions in the circadian rhythm. About half of patients with

The Complexities of PCOS

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder that has undergone many changes in diagnostic criteria over the last 30 years. Previously, the diagnosis was based on the presence of polycystic ovaries (PCO): an increased number of follicles in each ovary and/or an abnormally large ovarian volume. But the multi-system involvement in PCOS has led to multiple versions or subtypes of the disorder. PCOS and PCO are associated with metabolic and hormonal dysfunction including insulin resistance and the resulting high levels of androgens, such as testosterone. The result of this dysfunction is the characteristically high number of immature follicles within the

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