Give Your Blood Vessels Some TLC!

Published on July 13, 2014 by Dr. Paul Hrkal

Many people in North America suffer from diabetes, obesity and heart disease. One of the key underlying factors in all of the above conditions is inflammation and damage at the level of the blood vessel lining. The good news is that a diet high in antioxidants such as vitamin C actually protects against these damaging effects. While diet is essential, especially for prevention, it sometimes is not enough to counteract established disease processes. Luckily vitamin C provides a simple solution. Vitamin C is most well-known for its use to combat colds, but a recent large-scale review study confirmed that 500mg of vitamin C reduced oxidative and inflammatory damage in the blood vessel wall (also called the endothelium). The researchers suggested that one of the reasons vitamin C has this beneficial effect was because it preserves nitric oxide function, a key factor in keeping blood vessels relaxed. However the benefits of vitamin C are not limited to nitric oxide.

Over 25 years ago Dr Linus Pauling and Dr Mathias Rath, the fathers of orthomolecular medicine, identified vitamin C as an essential factor in blood vessel healing. Unfortunately most people don’t have adequate levels of vitamin C and instead their body uses a fat complex called Lipoprotein A (similar to LDL cholesterol) to patch up damage to the endothelial wall. The negative tradeoff is that Lipoprotein A also inhibits an enzyme that breaks down blood clots. This creates a situation where the blood is stickier, predisposing a person to heart attacks and strokes.

Fortunately, the amino acids L-lysine and L-proline counteract the effects of Lipoprotein A by inactivating it and preventing the binding to blood clots. Dr’s Pauling and Rath also discovered that L-lysine and L-proline are synergistic with the effect of vitamin C in repairing the blood vessel wall. The elastin and collagen that give strength and flexibility to the arterial wall are rich in both of these amino acids. Vitamin C replaces the need for lipoprotein A since it is a key factor in collagen formation and repair. Dr Pauling and Dr Rath started using the combination of vitamin C with L-lysine and L-proline as a key protective factor in patients with cardiovascular disease.

AOR was the first company to appreciate the groundbreaking work of Pauling and Rath and created a product based on their original formulation. The product TLC 3.0 contains the aforementioned ingredients plus essential electrolytes magnesium, potassium and calcium. This formula is an excellent preventative strategy that addresses cardiovascular disease right at the source.

Along with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, TLC gives your blood vessels some tender loving care they deserve.

How do you keep your heart happy and healthy? Share your strategies and suggestions in the comments below!

Image by © 2015 Voyagerix via DollarPhotoClub

References

Ashor AW, Lara J, Mathers JC, Siervo M. Effect of vitamin C on endothelial function in health and disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Atherosclerosis. 2014 Jul;235(1):9-20.
Lippi G, Guidi G. Lipoprotein(a): an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci. 2003 Feb; 40(1): 1-42.
Rath M. and Pauling L. Immunological evidence for the accumulation of lipoprotein(a) in the atherosclerotic lesion of the hypoascorbemic guinea pig. PNAS. 87(23): 9388-90.
Rath M, Pauling L. Hypothesis: lipoprotein(a) is a surrogate for ascorbate. PNAS. 1990 Aug; 87(16): 6204-7.