I take AOR’s Total E, but I am concerned about toxicity and taking too much?

Published on April 30, 2013 by Dr. Jonothon Mainland

The upper dosage of Vitamin E, according to the NIH is 1,500IU for a 19+ year old Male/Female. AOR’s Total E provides roughly ~400mg per softgel of a mixed tocopherol and tocotrienol blend. For information regarding the benefits of supplementing with this blend, please visit (www.aor.ca/products-page/total-e/)

This is an interesting question, because I have noticed numerous new research articles that have been recently published about Vitamin E. One such study by experts at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University is titled, “Excess Vitamin E Intake Not a Health Concern”. The lead researcher, Maret Traber, an internationally recognized expert on Vitamin E, stated, “Taking too much Vitamin E is not the real concern. A more important issue is that more than 90 percent of people in the U.S. have inadequate levels of Vitamin E in their diet”.

The Institutes research reviewed the metabolism of Vitamin E to better understand the potential for toxicity. They found that two systems in the liver control the amount of Vitamin E in the body. They found very high intakes through supplementation at best, double Vitamin E levels in tissues, which they concluded, is not detrimental. Maret Traber went on to recommend that people take a daily multivitamin that has the full RDA of Vitamin E, as well as consume the vitamin through dietary sources.

Another recent study showed that those who quit smoking along with taking Vitamin E, had improvements in vascular function and greater drops in future risk for developing cardiovascular disease than those who did not consume the vitamin and quit smoking.

A study done at Rutgers University, showed a blend of Vitamin E isomers slowed down tumour development in mice, to add to the mix of studies involving Vitamin E and cancer.

Yet another recent article showed an “inverse dose-respond relationship between vitamin E and liver cancer risk”, in which upon reviewing data from 132,837 individuals, they found those with high intakes of Vitamin E had a lower risk of developing liver cancer.

A very interesting study, recently conducted in mice with NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis), showed that Vitamin E helped with numerous symptoms related to NASH, such as reducing oxidative stress, fat deposition (obesity) and other signs of liver damage. Vitamin E has previously been shown in humans to improve symptoms of NASH, but has not been studied in this fashion to improve such symptoms. There currently is no treatment available for NASH which is also linked with Type II Diabetes and obesity. NASH patients are at a very high risk of requiring liver transplantation.

This new research sheds light not only on the benefit of vitamin E supplementation and the importance of a Vitamin E ‘blend’, but the significant number of people who are deficient, in this essential Vitamin. All in all, please stay within the recommended dosing limits for Vitamin E and only dose above these guidelines, if directed by a qualified health care practitioner.

References:

Oregon State University (2013, April 15). Excess vitamin E intake not a health concern, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2013, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2013/04/130415151434.htm#.UW1rK317d50.twitter

Ohio State University (2013, April 23). Quit smoking? Vitamin E may give extra boost to heart health. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2013, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2013/04/130423090802.htm#.UXgW46pc1hk.twitter

Rutgers University (2012, April 23). Vitamin E in diet protects against many cancers, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2013, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2012/04/120423132015.htm

Wei Zhang, Xiao-Ou Shu, Honglan Li, Gong Yang, Hui Cai, Bu-Tian Ji, Jing Gao, Yu-Tang Gao, Wei Zheng, and Yong-Bing Xiang. Vitamin Intake and Liver Cancer Risk: A Report From Two Cohort Studies in China. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2012; DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djs277