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Weight Management

Natural Strategies to Optimise the Vaginal Microbiome

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Metabolic Syndrome and Weight Management

Weighty Matters Dear readers the topic of weight loss is a deeply personal and challenging topic for me both personally and professionally. So please note that the purpose of this blog is to bring greater awareness and understanding to the public regarding how our bodies regulate and store energy. While the tone is strictly academic, please remember that reality is much more complex and multifactorial. At the core of any weight discussion are humans who are multifaceted, as is our relationship with health. Always discuss with YOUR healthcare practitioner what long-term health considerations are best for you. A reductionist approach

Natural Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Heart Disease

Metabolic syndrome refers to the “perfect storm” of hypertension, dyslipidemia, poor blood glucose regulation, and the presence of intra-abdominal adipose accumulation. Having metabolic syndrome increases the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in addition to Type 2 diabetes.   Prevention and treatment of each of these disorders includes dietary and lifestyle changes, including decreasing intake of sugar and simple carbohydrates, and regular physical activity. However, many individuals find these changes too difficult, or may need additional support if areas such as blood pressure, glucose, insulin or cholesterol aren’t coming into normal range within a reasonable amount of time.   Conventional treatments often cause side effects that dissuade patients from

Natural Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease

Metabolic syndrome refers to the “perfect storm” of hypertension, dyslipidemia, poor blood glucose regulation, and the presence of intra-abdominal adipose accumulation. Having metabolic syndrome increases the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in addition to Type 2 diabetes. Prevention and treatment of each of these disorders includes dietary and lifestyle changes, including decreasing intake of sugar and simple carbohydrates, and regular physical activity. However, many individuals find these changes too difficult, or may need additional support if areas such as blood pressure, glucose, insulin or cholesterol aren’t coming into normal range within a reasonable amount of time. Conventional

Signs and Symptoms of Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a group of conditions that include too much fat around the waist, elevated blood pressure, high triglycerides, elevated blood sugar and low HDL cholesterol. These conditions pose a threat of increasing your risk for heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. The term “metabolic” refers to the biochemical processes involved in the body’s normal functioning. Metabolic syndrome is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle that includes being overly sedentary, eating too many calories and gaining weight, particularly around the waist. According to a 2014 study published in Chronic Diseases and Injuries in Canada, 19.1% of all Canadian

Nutritional Support for Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a group of risk factors that include abdominal fat, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and unhealthy cholesterol levels. Many studies have looked at combinations of food supplements for the benefit of multiple components associated with metabolic disease. One example of this is olive oil: polyphenols from olive extracts have enough antioxidant action to protect LDL particles from oxidative damage. Why is this so important? Oxidation of LDL cholesterol particles is a driving factor in atherosclerosis and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In fact, most CVD-related deaths are the result of a narrowing of

Thyro Support™: A Novel Approach to Improving Metabolism

We put on weight when we regularly consume more calories than we use through our normal bodily functions or expend during our daily physical activities. Over 60% of adult Canadians are overweight or obese and obesity is one of the major risk factors for a number of diseases. Unfortunately, losing weight by eating fewer calories and burning more energy is easier said than done. Many of our lifestyle habits make it difficult to shake those extra pounds. When we are stressed, it’s easy to reach for the sugary pick-me-up, or skip out on a few extra hours of much needed

The connection between thyroid function and weight gain

By Dr. Sarah Zadek ND The inability to lose weight from diet and exercise alone can be extremely frustrating. There are many factors that affect weight management, and for those who struggle with this it may be worth investigating other causes of this “stubborn metabolism.” One such cause is the functioning of the thyroid gland and its respective hormones. Thyroid hormones play crucial roles in how the body uses energy and regulates appetite. Additionally, fat cells, also called adipose tissue, contains their own messengers and hormones that affect energy stores and usage. The interaction between these cells, their messengers and

Part 2: Could Fructose and Uric Acid be Driving Diabetes?

The ability of fructose to raise uric acid levels sheds some light on possible mechanisms in the development of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This may be a new area where early interventions can be used. In animal and human trials, lowering uric acid improved a number of features of metabolic syndrome, which include renal damage, insulin resistance, high triglycerides and hypertension (Nakagawa et al 2006). It seems that fructose induced damage via uric acid may be a key initiating factor in the cascade of progression in metabolic syndrome since it drives may underlying processes. The harmful effects of fructose make

Intermittent Fasting: What’s All of the Hype About?

Intermittent fasting is a hot topic in the diet and nutrition world. There are many books, blogs, celebrities and even apps touting the many health benefits of this pattern of energy consumption.  The question is whether there is sufficient clinical research to supports these claims. Intermittent fasting has been a part of religious practices for centuries. Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu and Jewish populations all perform intermittent fasting at different times throughout the year.  Clinical studies on intermittent fasting are still quite limited and what we do know comes mostly from: animal studies, a handful of human trials with small sample

Part 1: Could Fructose and Uric Acid be Driving Diabetes?

Diabetes has now become an international health problem of epidemic proportions. According to the Canadian Diabetes Association there are currently 9 million Canadians living with diabetes or pre-diabetes. This number is expected to continue to grow at an accelerated pace. The center for disease control predicts that if the rate of growth continues one out of three people born today will have type 2 diabetes. These statistics have set off alarm bells at all levels of the government and health care system and they have begun dumping resources and funding into diabetes education, research and treatments. Fortunately, we have a

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