Acta-Resveratrol

AOR04142

For a healthy heart and a long life

  • A potent antioxidant responsible for the health benefits of red wine
  • Helps maintain a healthy heart
  • Mimics the longevity effects of calorie restriction
  • Promotes normal cell development
Gluten Free
Non-GMO
Soy Free
Vegan

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Resveratrol is an antioxidant belonging to the polyphenol family found in many plants such as various berries, peanuts, rhubarb and several oriental herbs including the Japanese Giant Knotweed. It is the main component in red wine that is responsible for its touted health benefits. Research has confirmed that resveratrol has powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in the body with the potential to impact many chronic diseases.

Studies with resveratrol have reported a diverse range of physiological and biochemical effects, particularly in the areas of heart health, immunity, and inflammation. Studies have shown that it reduces cholesterol and triglycerides, lowers blood pressure, and lowers the incidence of arterial plaque formation. However, the most unique application of resveratrol is that it mimics the effects of a calorie-restricted diet. A calorie-restricted diet is associated with different health benefits and has been shown to increase the lifespan of several different species. Resveratrol provides many of the beneficial effects of caloric restriction, making it a powerful addition to any anti-aging protocol.

Those in search of anti-aging nutrients, practicing life extension, those desiring the heart health benefits of wine without the negative effects of sugar and alcohol, could benefit from Acta-Resveratrol.

AOR Advantage
This formula contains several antioxidants that increase its overall effectiveness. Antioxidants function better in the body in combination rather than in isolation. Each capsule of AOR’s Acta-Resveratrol contains enough resveratrol to equal that found in approximately 180 glasses of red wine and without the negative side effects of alcohol.

NPN

80023955

Discussion

Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound found in various berries (cranberry, blueberry, grapes) and herbs. Acta-Resveratrol provides antioxidants and other factors for the maintenance of good health.

Guarantees

AOR guaratees that all ingredients have been declared on the label. Contains no wheat, gluten, nuts, peanuts, sesame seeds, sulphites, mustard, soy, dairy, eggs, fish, shellfish or any animal byproduct.

Adult Dosage

Take one capsule daily with food or as directed by a qualified health care practitioner.

Cautions

Do not use if pregnant or breastfeeding. Consult a health care practitioner for use beyond 6 weeks, or if you are taking phenytoin. Some people may experience headaches.

Main Applications
  • Antioxidant
  • Cellular metabolism
  • Anti-Aging
  • Cardiovascular health
  • Mitochondrial support
Disclaimer

The information and product descriptions appearing on this website are for information purposes only, and are not intended to provide or replace medical advice to individuals from a qualified health care professional. Consult with your physician if you have any health concerns, and before initiating any new diet, exercise, supplement, or other lifestyle changes.

Serving Size: One capsule
trans-Resveratrol
40 mg
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
40 mg

Key Non-Medicinal Ingredients:

Quercetin
50 mg
Rosemary extract
10 mg
Black pepper oleoresin
5 mg

Non-medicinal Ingredients: Gum Arabic, Microcrystalline cellulose, Maltodextrin, Silica, Sodium Benzoate and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid.
Capsule: hypromellose, titanium dioxide.

Antioxidant
Study 1:
A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study published in 2011 evaluated the effect of 10 mg resveratrol, administered over a 4-week period in patients with type 2 diabetes shown significant decreases in oxidative stress markers, as well as an improvement in insulin sensitivity.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21385509

Study 2:
In another study published in 2017, healthy participants were randomized to receive 1000 mg of resveratrol per day for 28 days, while the placebo group received no treatment. The participant samples were measured for antioxidant capacity, as well as cytokine analysis, with results showing an increase in the plasma antioxidant activity of the participants in the resveratrol group, compared to the placebo group. Along with this antioxidant capacity of resveratrol, the same study showed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines in the plasma of participants taking resveratrol, compared to the placebo group.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5435979/

Study 3:
In cell culture, platinum based compounds, like cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic agent, have been found to increase reactive oxygen species, thereby leading to increased oxidative stress in otherwise healthy cells. In the presence of resveratrol, however, blood platelet cells were protected against oxidative stress, even in the presence of cisplatin. Resveratrol inhibited platelet lipid peroxidation, induced by cisplatin, confirming the antioxidant potential of this polyphenol compound.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15638119

Study 4:
A randomized, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of red grape juice, standardized to resveratrol and quercetin content on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and lipid profiles. This study was carried out in both healthy participants and hemodialysis patients. Results showed that consumption of the juice increased the antioxidant capacity of the plasma in both healthy and hemodialysis participants, while causing a significant decrease in LDL cholesterol and LDL oxidation, suggesting an improvement in lipoprotein profile and cardiovascular disease biomarkers.
https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/84/1/252/4632976

Study 5:
A randomized, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of resveratrol to vitamin E and placebo, in a population of patients undergoing hemodialysis. Activation of neutrophils is a well recognized feature in dialysis patients, and superoxide-anion production by neutrophil NADPH oxidase may contribute significantly to oxidative stress. The results showed that regular consumption of resveratrol in red grape juice reduced neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity and plasma concentrations of oxidized LDL and inflammatory biomarkers, to a greater extent than Vitamin E and even more than the placebo group. This antioxidant effect of resveratrol is believed to favour a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors.
https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/87/4/1053/4633300

Anti-Aging
Study 1:
In a study published in 2017, researchers looked at the effects of resveratrol, compared to caloric restriction (CR) on anti-aging genes, SIRT1, forkhead box 3a (Foxo3a) and the Hu antigen (Hu R) in both cell culture and animal models. The findings from this study showed an increase in the expression of anti-aging genes by both resveratrol and CR, in a similar manner. Additionally, resveratrol treatment up-regulated telomerase activity, which is the repeat sequence at the 3’ end of chromosomes that gets shorter with replication. The authors conclude that the activity of resveratrol against SIRT1 was stronger than that of CR, suggesting a better effect as an anti-aging agent.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5630366/

Study 2:
In two studies conducted in mice on a high caloric daily intake, resveratrol administration led to increased survival rates and insulin sensitivity, compared to mice on a standard diet. This was important findings, as in humans, a high calorie diet is associated with many pathological conditions, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and non-fatty liver disease. The effect of resveratrol on high calorie diet mice was confirmed by body weight, latency and survival time, as well as biomarkers in plasma, including insulin growth factor, leptin, liver and kidney markers. Results showed alterations in plasma levels of markers that predict the onset of diabetes and a shorter lifespan. This effect of resveratrol is attributed to its activity on SIRT-1 and SIRT-1 independent pathways of AMPK (5’=AMP activated protein kinase) activation.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4990206/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22560220

Study 3:
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is considered and aging-dependent disease, and currently, there is no cure for AD. Current medicine looks to manage the symptoms associated with AD. Caloric restriction has been proposed as a way to decrease age-related cognitive decline and pathology in AD and they hypothesis is that resveratrol can do this as well, as observed in animal studies. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial in patients with mild to moderate AD, were given resveratrol in escalating 500 mg per day dose, every 13 weeks (or placebo) and monitored for 52 weeks. Although the participants reported mild adverse effects (nausea, diarrhea and weight loss), the results showed significant differences in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma levels of amyloid-beta 40 between the placebo and treatment groups. This is one of the first of its kind studies and more are needed to confirm the benefit of resveratrol against aging and cognitive decline.
https://n.neurology.org/content/85/16/1383

Cardiovascular Health
Study 1:
A study published in 2016 looked at the effect of resveratrol administration on common pathways in patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), in comparison to sex-aged matched healthy individuals. Resveratrol administration resulted in increased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in CAD patients, where oxidative stress is known to play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. The results suggest that resveratrol could improve the canonical pathways of metabolic syndrome in CAD patients.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27980591

Study 2:
A randomized, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of red grape juice, standardized to resveratrol and quercetin content on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and lipid profiles. This study was carried out in both healthy participants and hemodialysis patients. Results showed that consumption of the juice increased the antioxidant capacity of the plasma in both healthy and hemodialysis participants, while causing a significant decrease in LDL cholesterol and LDL oxidation, suggesting an improvement in lipoprotein profile and cardiovascular disease biomarkers.
https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/84/1/252/4632976

Study 3:
A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of resveratrol in patients with type II diabetes (T2DM). in this study, participants received 800 mg of resveratrol or placebo for 8 weeks and monitored for oxidative stress responses, as well as metabolic and anthropometric parameters. Along with an increase in antioxidant capacity of the plasma of participants on resveratrol, this group also showed a significant reduction in weight, BMI and blood pressure levels, compared to the placebo group.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29357033

Study 4:
A randomized, cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study evaluated the benefits of trans-resveratrol in hypertensive patients, with endothelial dysfunction. Patients were given a single dose of 300 mg resveratrol or placebo, allowed a one week washout period, before cross over to the alternate group. Participants blood pressure measurements (aortic systolic blood pressure) and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were measured in each participant before and 90 minutes after resveratrol administration. The results show an increase in FMD in the female participants, but not the male participants. Additionally, it was observed that patients with higher levels of LDL cholesterol had a better FMD response to resveratrol administration, compared to those with lower levels, although no significant differences in blood pressure measurements were observed between the groups. It should be noted that this study evaluated a single dose of resveratrol in the participants and as such, the lack of significant differences in blood pressure measurements between the groups is not surprising.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29431520

Study 5:
Another double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the effect of acute administration of resveratrol in overweight individuals with mildly elevated blood pressures. One hour after the consumption of placebo, 30 mg resveratrol, 90 mg resveratrol or 270 mg resveratrol, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured. The results show a significant dose-dependent increase in FMD in the resveratrol groups, compared to the placebo group, confirming the cardiovascular health benefit of resveratrol.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20674311

Study 5:
Another double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial observed the effect of resveratrol and other phytochemicals on blood pressure levels in hypertensive patients. Participants were given resveratrol (60 mg), along with 60 mg quercetin, green tea, ginkgo biloba, bilberry and grape seed extract or placebo for 28 days, separated by a 2-week washout period before the cross-over. Results show a significant decrease in diastolic but not systolic blood pressure in the treatment group, compared to the placebo group. Urinary nitrate and nitrite concentrations were also significantly increased after supplementation, suggesting a potentiation of eNOS activation and nitric oxide production by plant polyphenols, including resveratrol and quercetin.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26059745

Study 7:
In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, 44 healthy individuals were administered 400 mg resveratrol, 100 mg quercetin and 400 mg grape skin extract for a month. The researchers measured levels of endothelial cell markers – ICAM, VCAM and IL-8. Results show a significant decrease in endothelial ICAM, VCAM and IL-8, as well as a decreased level of plasma interferon-γ, compared to the placebo group. This is a significant show of the effect of resveratrol in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23098852

Cognitive Health
Study 1:
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is considered and aging-dependent disease, and currently, there is no cure for AD. Current medicine looks to manage the symptoms associated with AD. Caloric restriction has been proposed as a way to decrease age-related cognitive decline and pathology in AD and the hypothesis is that resveratrol can do this as well, as observed in animal studies. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial in patients with mild to moderate AD, were given resveratrol in escalating 500 mg per day dose, every 13 weeks (or placebo), and monitored for 52 weeks. Although the participants reported mild adverse effects (nausea, diarrhea, and weight loss), the results showed significant differences in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma levels of amyloid-beta 40 between the placebo and treatment groups. This is one of the first of its kind studies and more are needed to confirm the benefit of resveratrol against aging and cognitive decline.
https://n.neurology.org/content/85/16/1383

Study 2:
A retrospective study in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease (AD) was published in 2017. This study evaluated the effect of 1000 mg resveratrol, twice daily, against amyloid-beta 40 (Aβ40) levels, in comparison to a placebo control group for 52 weeks. The results show a significant difference between the placebo and resveratrol treated group, with resveratrol reducing levels of Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), increased fibroblast growth factor-2 and MMP10, while decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. the mini-mental status exam (MMSE) was used to determine if resveratrol could decrease declines in mental scores; the results showed that it does. The results suggest that resveratrol administration can modulate neuroinflammation and induce adaptive immunity in patients with mild to moderate AD.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28086917

Study 3:
Single doses of resveratrol has been shown in clinical studies to improve cerebral blood flow but no cognitive improvements were observed – https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41465-019-00139-2 – this is not surprising, hello, one-time dose! More studies are needed to evaluate more long term use of resveratrol in cognitive health, especially in healthy populations.
This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-groups study aimed to evaluate what effect chronic resveratrol supplementation has on cognitive function, mood, sleep, health and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in healthy, young, adults, aged 18 to 30 years old. Participants were given 500 mg resveratrol for 28 days and monitored for cognitive tasks, as well as blood pressure and CBF. Results showed reduced fatigue and increased CBF modulation in the resveratrol treated group. Improvement in the 3-back responses with supplementation suggest an improvement in working memory with resveratrol supplementation. The results of the study also demonstrates that 500 mg of trans-resveratrol is able to augment the CBF response to cognitive task demands, relative to placebo, after acute, oral administration to healthy human participants.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26344014

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