MACA

AOR04296

Supports sexual health and hormonal health

  • A Peruvian root traditionally used as an adaptogen
  • Supports sexual function & psychological wellbeing for men and women
  • Helps relieve menopausal symptoms and balance hormone levels
  • Socially & ecologically responsible harvesting
Gluten Free
Non-GMO
Vegan

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Maca (Lepidium meyenii), a plant native to Peru, is a cruciferous, mineral-rich plant whose roots are eaten as a vegetable by the indigenous peoples. Maca balances the effects of major steroid hormones such as estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone, and seems to create effects that are specific to the condition of the individual, elevating low levels of some hormones while lowering levels of hormones present in excess. Health professionals who use Maca in their practices thus report that Maca assists in the maintenance of sexual function in aging men and women, and can be helpful in normalizing menopausal and premenstrual symptoms in women.

As an adaptogen (a substance that helps the body adapt to stress), Maca has been shown to support bone structure, fight stress, increase energy, and promote balanced blood glucose levels and cardiovascular health.

AOR Advantage

AOR’s Maca is the only maca supplement available which is grown in an environment free of pesticides and fertilizers. The harvesting process is socially as well as ecologically responsible: the root is purchased directly from traditional cattle herders in the Andes. The decision-making process on land use is communitarian/consensus-based, with the communal council having final say on crop planting and harvesting. This allows these peoples to retain aspects of their traditional culture while integrating to a necessary degree into the prevailing cash economy.

NPN

80042647

Discussion

Maca is a plant relative of the radish and is used to support emotional aspects of sexual health for both men and women. Ethically sourced from Peru, it also supports mood balance during menopause and provides antioxidants.

Guarantee

AOR™ guarantees that all ingredients have been declared on the label. Contains no wheat, gluten, nuts, peanuts, sesame seeds, sulphites, mustard, soy, dairy, eggs, fish, shellfish or any animal byproduct.

Adult Dosage

Take two capsules daily with or without food or as directed by a qualified health care practitioner.

Cautions

Consult a health care practitioner prior to use if you if you are pregnant or breastfeeding, have high blood pressure, are taking blood thinners or antidepressants, suffer from any psychological disorder or condition such as frequent anxiety or depression. Consult a health care practitioner for use beyond three months, or beyond six weeks for menopausal & postmenopausal women.

Main Applications
  • Menopause support
  • Andropause support
  • Premenstrual syndrome
  • Sports performance
  • Libido
  • Stress
Disclaimer

The information and product descriptions appearing on this website are for information purposes only, and are not intended to provide or replace medical advice to individuals from a qualified health care professional. Consult with your physician if you have any health concerns, and before initiating any new diet, exercise, supplement, or other lifestyle changes.

Serving Size: Two Capsules
Lepidium meyenii (Maca) root extract
750 mg

Non-medicinal Ingredients: microcrystalline cellulose, maltodextrin, sodium stearyl fumarate. Capsule: hypromellose.

Sexual Function and Libido

A 2010 systematic review has been performed on effect of maca on sexual function in humans. Four randomized clinical trials (RCT) met all the inclusion criteria. According to the review, two RCTs suggested a significant positive effect of maca on sexual dysfunction or sexual desire in healthy menopausal women or healthy adult men, while the other RCT failed to show any effects in healthy cyclists. Authors showed that maca extract significantly improved the self-rated sexual desire score compared to the baseline test and compared to the placebo trial after supplementation. The authors cautioned that more research is required.

Note: Evidence revealed that maca extract seems to have better effect than gelatinized maca and that of maca flour (effects seen as early as 14 days of treatment compared to eight weeks). The superiority of the extract seems to be due to the concentration of the secondary metabolites.

Shin BC, Lee MS, Yang EJ, Lim HS, Ernst E. Maca (L. meyenii) for improving sexual function: a systematic review. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2010;10:44. Published 2010 Aug 6. doi:10.1186/1472-6882-10-44 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2928177/

A 2002, 12‐week double blind placebo‐controlled, randomized, parallel trial aimed to demonstrate if effect of Maca on subjective report of sexual desire was because of effect on mood or serum testosterone levels. An active treatment with different doses of Maca ‘gelatinizada’ was compared with placebo. Men aged 21–56 years received Maca in one of two doses: 1500 mg or 3000 mg or placebo. Self‐perception on sexual desire, score for Hamilton test for depression, and Hamilton test for anxiety were measured at four, eight and 12 weeks of treatment. An improvement in sexual desire was observed with Maca from eight weeks of treatment. Serum testosterone and oestradiol levels were not different in men treated with Maca and in those treated with placebo. Logistic regression analysis showed that Maca has an independent effect on sexual desire at eight and 12 weeks of treatment, and this effect is not because of changes in either Hamilton scores for depression or anxiety or serum testosterone and oestradiol levels. In conclusion, treatment with Maca improved sexual desire.

Gonzales, G.F., Córdova, A., Vega, K., Chung, A., Villena, A., Góñez, C. and Castillo, S. (2002), Effect of Lepidium meyenii (MACA) on sexual desire and its absent relationship with serum testosterone levels in adult healthy men. Andrologia, 34: 367-372. doi:10.1046/j.1439-0272.2002.00519.x https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1046/j.1439-0272.2002.00519.x

A small 2008 study investigated the effect of 14 days maca supplementation on endurance performance and sexual desire in trained male cyclists, eight participants each completed a 40 km cycling time trial before and after 14 days supplementation with both maca extract (ME) and placebo, in a randomised cross-over design. Subjects also completed a sexual desire inventory during each visit. Conclusion: The study found that ME administration significantly improved the self-rated sexual desire score compared to the baseline test and compared to the placebo trial after supplementation. These promising results encourage long-term clinical studies involving more volunteers, to further evaluate the efficacy of ME in athletes and normal individuals and to explore its possible mechanisms of action.

Stone M, Ibarra A, Roller M, Zangara A, Stevenson E. A pilot investigation into the effect of maca supplementation on physical activity and sexual desire in sportsmen. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009;126(3):574-576. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2009.09.012 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19781622/

Sperm Function and Quality

A 2001 study was designed to determine the effect of an oral treatment of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on seminal analysis in nine adult normal men aged 24-44 years old. They received Maca tablets (1500 or 3000 mg/day) for 4 months. Seminal analysis was performed according to guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO). Serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) were measured before and after treatment. Results: Treatment with Maca resulted in increased seminal volume, sperm count per ejaculum, motile sperm count, and sperm motility. Serum hormone levels were not modified with Maca treatment. Increase of sperm count was not related to dose of Maca. Conclusion: Maca improved sperm production and sperm motility by mechanisms not related to LH, FSH, PRL, T and E2.

Gonzales GF, Cordova A, Gonzales C, Chung A, Vega K, Villena A. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) improved semen parameters in adult men. Asian J Androl. 2001;3(4):301-303. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11753476/

A 2016 systematic review aimed at assessing the evidence for the effectiveness of maca (Lepidium meyenii) in improving semen quality. Five studies – three randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and two uncontrolled observational studies (UOSs) – met all the inclusion criteria. One RCT found favorable effects of maca on sperm mobility in infertile men. The two other RCTs showed positive effects of maca on several semen quality parameters in healthy men. The two UOSs also suggested favorable effects of maca on semen quality. Conclusion: The results of the systematic review provide suggestive evidence for the effectiveness of maca in improving semen quality. However, the total number of trials, the total sample size, and the risk of bias of the included studies prevent the drawing firm conclusions. More rigorous studies are warranted.

Mild Erectile Dysfunction

A 2009, double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 50 Caucasian men affected by mild erectile dysfunction (ED), randomised to treatment with Maca dry extract (2400 mg) or placebo. The treatment effect on ED and subjective well-being was tested administrating before and after 12 weeks the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P). Conclusion: the data support a small but significant effect of Maca supplementation on subjective perception of general and sexual well-being in adult patients with mild ED.

Zenico T, Cicero AF, Valmorri L, Mercuriali M, Bercovich E. Subjective effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) extract on well-being and sexual performances in patients with mild erectile dysfunction: a randomised, double-blind clinical trial. Andrologia. 2009;41(2):95-99. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0272.2008.00892.x https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19260845/

SSRI Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Women

In a 2008, double‐blind, randomized, parallel group dose‐finding pilot study compared a low‐dose (1.5 g/day) to a high‐dose (3.0 g/day) maca regimen in 17 women with selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor-(SSRI-)induced sexual dysfunction. The Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ) were used to measure sexual dysfunction. Subjects on 3.0 g/day maca had a significant improvement in ASEX and in MGH-SFQ scores but subjects on 1.5 g/day maca did not. Libido improved significantly based on ASEX item number one, but not by dosing groups. Conclusion: Maca root may alleviate SSRI‐induced sexual dysfunction, and there may be a dose‐related effect. Maca may also have a beneficial effect on libido and it was well tolerated.

Dording CM, Fisher L, Papakostas G, et al. A double-blind, randomized, pilot dose-finding study of maca root (L. meyenii) for the management of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. CNS Neurosci Ther. 2008;14(3):182-191. doi:10.1111/j.1755-5949.2008.00052.x https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6494062/

In a 2015, 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion: Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women.

Dording CM, Schettler PJ, Dalton ED, et al. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of maca root as treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in women. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015;2015:949036. doi:10.1155/2015/949036 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4411442/

Menopause Symptoms

In 2008, fourteen postmenopausal women completed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. They received 3.5 g/day of powered Maca for six weeks and matching placebo for six weeks, in either order, over a total of 12 weeks. At baseline and weeks six and 12 blood samples were collected for the measurement of estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin, and the women completed the Greene Climacteric Scale to assess the severity of menopausal symptoms. In addition, aqueous and methanolic Maca extracts were tested for androgenic and estrogenic activity. Conclusions: Preliminary findings show that Lepidium meyenii (Maca) (3.5 g/d) reduces psychological symptoms, including anxiety and depression, and lowers measures of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women independent of estrogenic and androgenic activity.

Brooks NA, Wilcox G, Walker KZ, Ashton JF, Cox MB, Stojanovska L. Beneficial effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) on psychological symptoms and measures of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women are not related to estrogen or androgen content. Menopause. 2008;15(6):1157-1162. doi:10.1097/gme.0b013e3181732953 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18784609/

Four RCTs included in a 2011 systematic review tested the effects of maca on menopausal symptoms in healthy perimenopausal, early postmenopausal, and late postmenopausal women. Using the Kupperman Menopausal Index and the Greene Climacteric Score, all RCTs demonstrated favorable effects of maca. Conclusion: There have been very few rigorous trials of maca for menopausal symptoms. The results of this systematic review provide limited evidence for the effectiveness of maca as a treatment for menopausal symptoms. However, the total number of trials, the total sample size, and the average methodological quality of the primary studies, were too limited to draw firm conclusions.

Lee MS, Shin BC, Yang EJ, Lim HJ, Ernst E. Maca (Lepidium meyenii) for treatment of menopausal symptoms: A systematic review. Maturitas. 2011;70(3):227-233. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.07.017 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21840656/

A 2015, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was conducted in 29 postmenopausal Hong Kong Chinese women to evaluate the effects of Maca on hormones, lipids, glucose, serum cytokines, blood pressure, menopausal symptoms, and general well-being. They received 3.3 g/day of Maca or placebo for 6 weeks each, in either order, over 12 weeks. At baseline, week six and week 12, estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), full lipid profiles, glucose and serum cytokines were measured. The Greene Climacteric, SF-36 Version two, Women’s Health Questionnaire and Utian Quality of Life Scales were used to assess the severity of menopausal symptoms and health-related quality of life. Conclusions: Maca did not exert hormonal or immune biological action in the small cohort of patients studied but it appeared to reduce symptoms of depression and improve diastolic blood pressure in Chinese postmenopausal women. The results are comparable to previous similar published studies in postmenopausal women.

Stojanovska L, Law C, Lai B, et al. Maca reduces blood pressure and depression, in a pilot study in postmenopausal women. Climacteric. 2015;18(1):69-78. doi:10.3109/13697137.2014.929649 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24931003/

Energizer / Adaptogen

A small 2008 study investigated the effect of 14 days maca supplementation on endurance performance and sexual desire in trained male cyclists, Eight participants each completed a 40 km cycling time trial before and after 14 days supplementation with both maca extract (ME) and placebo, in a randomised cross-over design. Conclusion: The study found that using maca extract for 14 days significantly improved performance for male cyclists compared to the baseline test but not compared to the placebo trial after supplementation. These promising results encourage long-term clinical studies involving more volunteers, to further evaluate the efficacy of ME in athletes and normal individuals and to explore its possible mechanisms of action.

Stone M, Ibarra A, Roller M, Zangara A, Stevenson E. A pilot investigation into the effect of maca supplementation on physical activity and sexual desire in sportsmen. J Ethnopharmacol. 2009;126(3):574-576. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2009.09.012 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19781622/

Hypertension

A 2015, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was conducted in 29 postmenopausal Hong Kong Chinese women to evaluate the effects of Maca on hormones, lipids, glucose, serum cytokines, blood pressure, menopausal symptoms, and general well-being. They received 3.3 g/day of Maca or placebo for six weeks each, in either order, over 12 weeks. Conclusions: Maca did not exert hormonal or immune biological action in the small cohort of patients studied but it appeared to reduce symptoms of depression and improve diastolic blood pressure in Chinese postmenopausal women. The results are comparable to previous similar published studies in postmenopausal women.

Stojanovska L, Law C, Lai B, et al. Maca reduces blood pressure and depression, in a pilot study in postmenopausal women. Climacteric. 2015;18(1):69-78. doi:10.3109/13697137.2014.929649 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24931003/

Traditionally used medicinal plants, herbs and spices in Latin America were investigated to determine their phenolic profiles, antioxidant activity and in vitro inhibitory potential against key enzymes relevant for hyperglycemia and hypertension. Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp), Molle (Schinus molle), Caigua (Cyclanthera pedata) and ginger (Zingiber officinale) inhibited significantly the hypertension relevant angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro.

Ranilla LG, Kwon YI, Apostolidis E, Shetty K. Phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and in vitro inhibitory potential against key enzymes relevant for hyperglycemia and hypertension of commonly used medicinal plants, herbs and spices in Latin America. Bioresour Technol. 2010;101(12):4676-4689. doi:10.1016/j.biortech.2010.01.093 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20185303/

Animal Studies
Since 2000 to this date, several studies have been reported on biological or pharmacological effect of maca on experimental animals. A summary of the Properties for maca after in vivo administration in experimental animals can be found here:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3184420/#B1
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19260845/