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Heart Health

Natural Strategies to Optimise the Vaginal Microbiome

Natural Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Heart Disease

Metabolic syndrome refers to the “perfect storm” of hypertension, dyslipidemia, poor blood glucose regulation, and the presence of intra-abdominal adipose accumulation. Having metabolic syndrome increases the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in addition to Type 2 diabetes.   Prevention and treatment of each of these disorders includes dietary and lifestyle changes, including decreasing intake of sugar and simple carbohydrates, and regular physical activity. However, many individuals find these changes too difficult, or may need additional support if areas such as blood pressure, glucose, insulin or cholesterol aren’t coming into normal range within a reasonable amount of time.   Conventional treatments often cause side effects that dissuade patients from

Natural Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease

Metabolic syndrome refers to the “perfect storm” of hypertension, dyslipidemia, poor blood glucose regulation, and the presence of intra-abdominal adipose accumulation. Having metabolic syndrome increases the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in addition to Type 2 diabetes. Prevention and treatment of each of these disorders includes dietary and lifestyle changes, including decreasing intake of sugar and simple carbohydrates, and regular physical activity. However, many individuals find these changes too difficult, or may need additional support if areas such as blood pressure, glucose, insulin or cholesterol aren’t coming into normal range within a reasonable amount of time. Conventional

Heart Health After Menopause – Is HRT the Answer?

There are many curious and complex occurrences that take place during menopause as any post-menopausal woman can attest. Most of these changes occur because of the changes in estrogen production1. Menopause marks the natural progression from reproductive to non-reproductive phase of life. This transition is initiated by the gradual reduction of ovarian estrogen output1,2. This has a systemic effect, and these changes can come with certain challenges such as unexpected hot flashes, alterations in libido, and mood changes2. An area that often goes overlooked are the changes in the cardiovascular system that accompany the drop in estrogen1-3. Interestingly, while men

Cardiovascular Disease: The Leading Men’s Health Threat

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in men. Though women tend to have equal numbers of incidences, they are typically later in life and therefore it is often thought that the threat of this type of disease is greater in men. In 2019 heart disease was responsible for one in four deaths of men in the United States. Though genetics can predispose individuals to cardiovascular issues, there are many things that can be done to help treat and prevent cardiovascular disease from arising. Below are some suggestions as to what one can do to maintain a healthy heart

Alcohol and Heart Disease: A Fine Balance

The heart is a magnificent and mighty organ, in fact the entire circulatory system should take a bow! Continuously sending out rich oxygenated blood throughout our bodies, and recycling it in a highly calibrated, exquisitely complex system of inputs and adjustments. The heart adjusts the force and rate of contractions while blood vessels manage pressure and perfusion based on a number of signals such as fluid volume, exertion and even our mood. The point being that our cardiovascular system operates with military precision, that is of course until it doesn’t. Heart disease defines a group of conditions related to the

Research Spotlight: B-Vitamins and Blood Pressure

What’s Already Known on This Topic? High blood pressure (or hypertension) is the leading risk factor contributing to death worldwide, primarily from heart disease and stroke. Effective lowering of blood pressure, even by small amounts, is however proven to reduce these events, and can thus save lives in middle and older age. Along with the well-recognized nutrition and lifestyle factors that contribute to higher blood pressure, there is much interest in the role of genetic factors. This aspect is receiving greater attention in recent years with the emergence of ‘genome-wide association studies’ or GWAS, an approach that involves rapidly scanning

Nutritional Management of Vascular Health

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the second leading cause of death in Canada, after cancer, and a leading cause of hospitalization.[i] CVD is a broad term that refers to more than one disease of the circulatory system. Amongst them, vascular disease includes any condition that affects your circulatory system, such as peripheral artery disease. This ranges from diseases of your arteries, veins and lymph vessels to blood disorders that affect circulation.[ii] Besides traditional risk factors such as lipids profile and blood pressure, researchers are investigating newer cardiovascular risk factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, endothelial function and conditions which predispose people

How Cardiovascular Health Influences Cognition

The onset of dementia and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) don’t typically manifest until the age of 65 or so. But what if you could decrease your risk of developing dementia, or even age-related cognitive decline, if you addressed cardiovascular health in mid-life or earlier? Evidence of the significance of cardiovascular health on cognition and neuroprotection is mounting, and it can be seen as early as childhood.  There are multiple factors at play, notably blood vessel health and oxygen delivery to the brain, as well as the release of certain neuroprotective compounds in the body, which can be upregulated by

Living for a Healthy Cholesterol Level

Linked not only to a healthy heart, but also to better overall health in general, cholesterol is an extremely important part of our internal makeup and understanding how to manage both “good” and “bad” cholesterol levels can lead to a longer, healthier life. As we age, managing cholesterol becomes not only more important but also more difficult. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that men with less than optimal aerobic fitness are at a greater risk of developing high cholesterol in their early 30s, while men with higher aerobic fitness are likely to

Journey to Ironman: Part 1 of 4

The journey to becoming an Ironman is more than just crossing a finish line at the end of a race, it’s a lifelong adventure of being the best you can be and improving yourself. Every person’s story is unique and everyone has a different reason for wanting to complete the challenge which is known for being one of the most mentally and physically demanding endurance races in the world. Ultimately, I chose to do it for me, follow through with the commitment to myself, and to prove that the body is much more capable than what we realize. Anything is

Be Your Best Blood Pressure

What is blood pressure and how does it relate to health? Blood pressure is a measurement of how hard your heart has to work to pump blood out to the body. It calculates the volume of blood leaving your heart (cardiac output) by the resistance it faces when it leaves (peripheral resistance.) There are many contributing factors to make up this number: How healthy is your heart? How much blood volume do you have? Did you lose blood? How strong and flexible are your arteries? How old and what sex are you? What is your genetic susceptibility or risk? What

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